Now discover your strengths book

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Now, Discover Your Strengths book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Based on a massive Gallup study of 2 million people. download Now, Discover Your Strengths: How To Develop Your Talents And Those Of The Donald O. Clifton (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Now, Discover Your Strengths [Marcus Buckingham, Donald O. Clifton] on nvrehs.info *FREE* shipping Sold by: musicogswell books & more. Have one to.

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Now Discover Your Strengths Book

Based on a massive Gallup study of 2 million people, this book shows 1) individuals how to cultivate their own career strengths and strengths, 2) managers how. StrengthsFinder is now CliftonStrengths - Learn how to discover your 34 theme and how to register your book code. Now, Discover Your Strengths is a self-help book written by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton, first published in At the heart of the book is the.

I read this book as part of a leadership development program that I am in for work. I learned more about myself from this book and the quiz results than I have in the first twelve months of the program. I learned why I have issues with losing my train of thought when speaking, why I feel this incessant need to constantly achieve and learn something, why I value my alone time. Of even greater importance, I was given helpful hints how to make these strengths work for me on the job and in my personal life. This blog is an excellent example of something that is using my strength of the need to reflect and think about things thoroughly. The fact that I read so many books of almost every genre is due to my passion for learning, which I can channel into my now-complete MBA studies and my CMA studying. I also discovered that my ideal job is ideal because it perfectly suits each one of my top five strengths. When it happens to all of us, when we all feel empowered by the information learned about ourselves, you know that this is a life-altering book. It was recommended but not required, but I feel I got more out of the quiz results and the list of my top five strengths because I read the book. Of course, it is a book, and I'm not someone to turn down reading one. I cannot stress enough how much my perception on who I am has changed as a result of reading this and getting my top five themes. It was worth every minute of reading. The Gallup Organization conducted a survey of over two million people to discover the source of their strengths. They provide a login for an online survey to "discover" your strengths.

How can I use this with my team? What does it take to become a strengths-based organization? All these questions and more, as well as the technical report on the Assessment are included in this fine book. Or you can simply work with a coach who can synthesize and personalize all the available information on Strengths for you and your team.

What is the best use of your time? A Book Review: Previous Post Next Post. Share this Post. Stay Connected. After hammering myself on my weaknesses all my life, this is a very liberating and exciting change.

Embora eu acredite muito mais em neuroplasticidade do que o livro apregoa e limita, eu tenho que reconhecer o valor da teoria dos Pontos Fortes e que devemos focar neles. As the brain can't do everything well, based on genes and magic they build certain pathways that are optimised for excellence in certain areas.

What it also gives is a methodology how Gallup many years ago developed a tool to indicate personal strength areas. Which you rarely get and what is generally interesting to learn about. In this case they indicate 34 themes of strengths and give plenty of descriptions of how they look like at the workplace and how they can be encouraged. The last part is more for managers who work with teams and look for ways to build a system where everyone's strengths are realised.

The general idea is the same old good one - productivity or growth means different things for different individuals. As the trends recommend, "personalise" Cita muitos exemplos de caso de sucesso e como aplicar dentro da empresa. Livro para se consultar sempre, vale muito como um estudo. Mar 16, Alex rated it really liked it Shelves: I liked the book ok. I happened to have a copy with a valid test code, so I took it for free. My top five turned out to be: Learner, Realtor, Futuristic, Restorative, Discipline.

I must say, the research seems intriguing, but I ended up feeling confused about managing my strengths in the end. The authors definitely spent more energy and polishing the "analysis" part of the research. I can see that it's backed by some data and therefore the descriptions of strengths and examples of personalities re I liked the book ok. I can see that it's backed by some data and therefore the descriptions of strengths and examples of personalities read very convincing.

Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham

The second - "synthesis" part feels weaker in comparison. Some recommendations how to grow your own strengths could be drawn from manager's one-pagers "how to manage a person strong in X", but they seem to be very generic and less impressive.

It seems that they were "made up" by qualitative research if any and not backed up by data. Same goes for the recommendations about how to build a strength-focused company. Some good advice, but I could not help but feel that it is too shallow and abrupt. It seemed more like a "coaching" advice and not a clear framework which could be used by HR department to go out and implement it.

Although I do see that some of the recommendations are being used in today's corporations - broad role salary bands, clearly defined performance objectives, regular one-on-ones with managers etc. Also, authors compare their test to "industry placement" career tests and claim that Strength test does not peg a person into any field while standard career tests do.

This is kind of BS. Modern personality tests rarely place a person into a field, they provide examples of some fields at most. And then authors proceed with effectively recommendation of pegging "strength profiles" into employment "roles". So they say, "hey, we don't place you into industry, just role" as if it is not correlated with industry in any way.

In retail the most common role would be "Sales person", in technology it will be "Engineer" so this whole "we are not like others, we are better" claim is kind of ridiculous.

A Book Review: “Now, Discover Your Strengths”

So here it is. I think this book and test is useful to introspect your own strengths, but then it leaves you hanging there. The rest of the story reads as poorly formalized recommendations which authors scrambled out of their personal opinions and conclusions to sell their coaching services to corporations.

It still has value, but it will take a lot of effort and trial and error for a CEO or HR person to work through it and come up with a real plan. Perhaps once authors collect enough data on the companies they helped, they can produce a better book with the real recommendations to both companies and individuals Jul 02, Erin rated it really liked it Shelves: This was recommended by trainers in our Human Resources dept.

It was really interesting, and a different take on figuring out where you fit in your career--are you in the right role, and the right organization?

I've done many personality tests and know my Myers Briggs score like the back of my hand ISFJ if you're interested , but personality testing is based on opposite ends of the spectrum--if you're extroverted, you can't be introverted, if you're good with machines, you can't be good with This was recommended by trainers in our Human Resources dept.

ISFJ if you're interested , but personality testing is based on opposite ends of the spectrum--if you're extroverted, you can't be introverted, if you're good with machines, you can't be good with people, etc. Strengths, which are a combination of talent, knowledge, and skills, are based on different 34 "themes", and you take a test which I haven't taken yet to determine your top 5 themes. These combined themes are what make you who you are, and they show you where your strengths lie.

One of the most interesting parts of it is the discussion of weakness. Our idea is that a good employee is well-rounded, so we have to improve their weaknesses.

The authors disagree--you improve your strengths as much as you can, and just keep your weaknesses out of the way. Don't spend a lot of time trying to improve what will never be a strength for you. I thought that was a really interesting theory. Really interesting, and a great read for those still trying to figure out their right path!

First of all I agee with other reviewers that it's very annoying that you have to download a new book to get a valid access code to the online strenghtsfinder. As the premise of the book it is more effective to build on people's strenghts than to try to correct perceived weaknesses appealed to me I did download a new copy.

Of the five talents that came out of the test, three fit reasonably well. But when I read through all of them I realised that my most dominant strenght had not come out of the test.

T First of all I agee with other reviewers that it's very annoying that you have to download a new book to get a valid access code to the online strenghtsfinder. Therefore I would advise to read all the talent descriptions and narrow down the ones you feel apply best to you; you don't actually need to take the online test, in my opinion.

Having finally figured out my own top five strenghts I was ready for action but all I found was that I should 'develop them'. The second half of the book contains mainly tips for managers in middle to large companies on how to coach current employees and find new ones. Only the section that specified how managers should deal with people with different dominant talents was mildly interesting. Of course, considering their claim that people have five dominant talents, one wonders about its usefulness.

All in all, the talents I finally recognized and the positive approach to personal growth have provided me with food for thought. But no more than that, unfortunately. Dec 05, Loy Machedo rated it liked it. Are you in the right job career but at the wrong position? OR Are you in the right position but with the wrong job career? Should you focus on your strengths? OR Should you focus on your weakness? What are your key strengths?

And how many are there? Clifton is a brilliantly crafted book which can answer these questions or at least shed some light into answers you wanted so badly. On the upside, I loved the test that I could take to get to know Are you in the right job career but at the wrong position?

On the upside, I loved the test that I could take to get to know my personality and yes, it reinforced my beliefs about who I am. But on the downside, I detested the all times the sales pitch that was so prevalent throughout the book. It seemed to me that the author was doing his best to sell his concept though I personally felt he didnt have to.

And the second bit that I hated was the apologetic tone for which he wanted to justify the differences in personalities and the job careers they choose. He being the authority should have done so in a much more forceful manner. Overall, given both the good, bad and ugly, I felt this book is a must read as it sheds light into knowing ourselves more distinctly and with more accuracy. May 23, Martyn Lovell rated it it was ok.

That book takes a relatively simple set of ideas, and as is typical in business books, spins it out to pages of repetitive and unnecessary content. But ultimately, it made some good and useful points.

I got both books from a manager, so it took me some time to get around to reading them: This book has far less concrete content than the first. Its central thesis - easily understood in a few pages - is reasonable, though the auth This book is nominally a sequel to 'First Break All The Rules'.

Its central thesis - easily understood in a few pages - is reasonable, though the authors perhaps take it to unreasonable lengths. To supplement the thin content, the authors offer a personality test on the web that identifies your 5 of 34 'Signature Themes'. The test takes a long time to take, but the payoff from the test is somewhat thin.

In my case none of the strengths seemed surprising, and the book contained little practical advice about what to do with them next other than to focus on them. I do think there is a valuable point here, and it's great for managers to absorb this perspective.

But the book is probably not the best way to do so. Sep 18, Carlos rated it liked it Shelves: Philosophically, I believe in the message this book expounds, namely to focus on strengths - or what you one is good at - versus trying to overly improve weaknesses It's a short read and well worth it, but keep in mind that it's likely to tell you something you already know but just hadn't thought about a whole lot.

It does provide a set of personal strengths, a brief description about them, and how best to manage employees with that particular strength - Philosophically, I believe in the message this book expounds, namely to focus on strengths - or what you one is good at - versus trying to overly improve weaknesses It does provide a set of personal strengths, a brief description about them, and how best to manage employees with that particular strength - from this perspective, I did learn about how to deal with certain 'personalities' or 'strength profiles.

Then, if you are convinced you need to know what your top five strengths are, you will have to take the book's survey - which is only accessible via a code found in new copies. Jun 03, Kent rated it really liked it. I enjoyed this book. It takes an interesting approach to self-improvement. The main point being that you have certain talents that you develop in your early life.

Beyond your teens it is difficult to develop new talents. The general emphasis on self-improvement is traditionally focused on areas where you lack skill or talent. This book asserts that this approach is wrong. The idea that they promote is that you should focus on your strengths talents and focus on developing skills around your ta I enjoyed this book. The idea that they promote is that you should focus on your strengths talents and focus on developing skills around your talents.

I found this very thought provoking and interesting. The book includes a code for an on-line test to identify your talents. I took the test and it sounded about right. One thing that is a little lacking in the book is once you find out your talents, how to exploit them going forward. However, it is interesting to review your top talent and think about how it fits into your career.

Jun 03, Richard Stephenson rated it did not like it. I ripped out Chapter 4 describing the types , and chunked the book.

Mar 03, Jenny rapid tortoise rated it really liked it. Jan 04, Rajesh rated it it was ok Shelves: This is the "Linda Goodman's Handbook for Managers and HR types", which instead of saying "An Aquarius is assertive and charming and hence makes for a good salesman", tweaks it to talk about "Strength Themes" and "Excellence". It basically communicating the truth we all know that "All employees are unique" and hence "please read our totally generic, impossible to implement ways to maximize their potential".

For our brains and our intelligence to really develop, we had to lose a significant portion of synaptic connections.

By the time we turn 15, billions of these connections are wiped out permanently. Some connections become much stronger than others, and these are the connections that allow us to perform certain actions with greater proficiency. This explains why certain movements, responses or activities come to you naturally, while others will always feel uncomfortable. All that practice to help you reflect, maintain eye contact or keep an open and accepting attitude go right out the window!

Take a look at all the people around you. Unfortunately, many strengths go to waste when talents remain undetected. Discovering talents is a crucial task. But if you want to find talent where you least expect it, start by observing your spontaneous reactions. If you dive into the crowd and start making friends with strangers, you might have a talent for winning people over. On the other hand, if you immediately thought about who could potentially fill in for your employee, you might have a talent for rapid problem solving.

When examining your instinctive reactions, it helps to understand the two different indicators for different kinds of talent: Yearnings reveal the talents that appear early on in our lives. Mozart was only 12 years old when he wrote his first symphony! If you had a burning interest in as a child, why not explore it further? You may find a hidden talent there.

Rapid learning is another way to spot talent. When you pick up a new skill, how fast do you learn the ropes? Believe it or not, Henri Matisse only began painting by chance.

Book Review: Now, Discover Your Strengths

In the second book summary, we learned that it was important to be specific when describing talents. This is particularly important in the workplace, where different roles have diverse requirements. Do you have an analytical employee? He likes to back up his claims with logical thinking, and expects the same of others.

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This is something to remember when giving instructions to an analytical employee: Another employee of yours might be a restorative type. He likes solving problems and is always there to lift spirits when things seem hopeless.

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